IMG_2044What could be cuter than a French village? How about one with sumptuous roses climbing up its stone walls. Camon, in the southern French département of Ariège, is Rose Central. Unsurprisingly, it’s one of the “Plus Beaux Villages”–Most Beautiful Villages–of France, which is an official thing.IMG_2055IMG_2047IMG_2041IMG_2036In fact, last weekend Camon held a Rose Festival. Just before, I went with some visitors (which is why I didn’t post last Friday–stop the computer and smell the roses; I did however use my phone to take photos). It was funny to see folding tables set up in the little lanes, in preparation for the communal feast. IMG_2043Camon possibly has more blooms than humans (population 143). It’s called “Little Carcassonne.” It does indeed have lots of stone walls and a château, which is now a fancy hotel. It looks nice, but Camon is really, really quiet. I’d rather be in big Carcassonne, in our apartments to be precise, and take a daytrip down to Camon, which can easily be covered in meticulous detail in under an hour.

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Undoubtedly where the “Little Carcassonne” moniker came from.

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Hmph! Not old at all, at least in these parts!

IMG_2037Camon is just 10-15 minutes’ drive from Mirepoix, so you get a two-fer. A new Mirepoix post is coming soon, surprise, surprise.IMG_2049

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All the roses are planted in the tiniest holes in the pavement. No mulch possible!
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Rose bushes at the end of vineyard rows. Roses attract the pests first, alerting the winegrower. Like a canary in a coal mine.

IMG_2051It was raining the day we visited, but the light drizzle didn’t deter us. It might have even added to the ambiance, making the roses even brighter.

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Églantine, or sweet briar, a kind of wild rose. I have a friend named Églantine; isn’t that a gorgeous name?
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Rose petals on the ground…and not a speck of trash anywhere.

 

 

 

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31 thoughts on “Camon, Village of Roses

  1. Beautiful! My son has a rose bush by his front door. Seeing the rose petals scattered on his welcome mat is so pretty. From now on I will think of the rose petals at the doorway of the house in Camon!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Roses are my favorite of flowers. Sadly, I can’t grow them here (wild rose virus abounds). That said, I can certainly admire them whenever I encounter them. Your photographs here are amazing!

    Liked by 1 person

      1. It is a very sad disease. When I first saw it on my climbers I thought my neighbor had sprayed them with herbicide! 😱 As a keeper of antique roses I had invest a lot of time, effort and money to get them looking good. Then in only one growing season I lost all of them but two. If interested, you can read more here – (https://bygl.osu.edu/node/1113)

        Liked by 1 person

  3. It reminds me of Auvillar the village where my friends live. I last visited in May of 2015 and there were all the old fragrant climbing gorgeous roses blooming.
    A beautiful post!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. oooh the architecture! And I cannot believe the roses grow out of such a tiny whole in the pavement! They are so finicky here on the farm in rich soil even! What a charming town –

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Beautiful! The post, the photos and your descriptions. I had no idea roses could live and bloom and grow from such a tiny space. Are they a special variety? What kind will you be planting? Have a beautiful weekend.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. What an adorable village! It’s nice how small places can band together with a mission to keep things enchanting. Yet, I agree, it’s nice to make a thorough investigation as a visitor and stay somewhere with a bit more going on.

    Églantine is a beautiful name!

    Liked by 1 person

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