img_0658This summer we had the pleasure of meeting Oliver Gee and his lovely bride, Lina Nordin Gee, when they passed through Carcassonne on their honeymoon trip around France on an adorable red scooter. They stayed in our AirBnB apartment, L’ancienne Tannerie.

Oliver is the founder of “The Earful Tower,” a podcast and blog as well as fun Instagram about France, especially Paris. The stories are excellent–in fact, when I discovered The Earful Tower, I immediately binged all the episodes and have been listening ever since. Often I go back and listen again, because there are so many great details. And plenty of puns. I can now confirm what I suspected when listening–that he has a mischievous twinkle in his eye, what the French call espiègle, quick to spot humor in a situation.

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There he is, reading Peter Mayle in L’Ancienne Tannerie. The Earful Tower has a book club–check it out.

Oliver was gracious enough to submit to a little interview:

Who are you and what in the world are you doing?

I’m Oliver Gee, an Australian who has called Paris home for almost four years. Around a year ago, I quit my job as a journalist to focus on a podcast I’d been running called The Earful Tower. It’s been quite the gamble, but my goal was to make the project my full-time gig and I’m pretty much there.Screen Shot 2018-11-20 at 11.54.20 AMWhat are some of the biggest differences you observed between Paris and small-town/rural France?

The biggest difference I noticed was that people have more time for you outside of Paris. Paris is hectic, almost chaotic, as most big cities are. The baker doesn’t (usually) care to comment on the fact that you might be speaking French with an accent, they’ve probably heard that accent before anyway. In the countryside, there’s not a long line of people waiting for their food, drink, car to be serviced… whatever. What was really great about this for me was that it meant I had the chance to really converse with people in a day-to-day way, which is an excellent way to improve my French!

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There he is on the ramparts of la Cité de Carcassonne. Regular listeners will know Oliver loves a good, old wall.

Do you find it easier to eat well outside Paris? I have been to some fantastic restaurants in Paris, but they were pricey, whereas in the middle of France profonde you can get some awesome meals and they’re cheap. 

I have to say that the best meal I’ve had in France was in the middle of nowhere, in Puymirol at a two-star Michelin restaurant. It was my birthday so we splashed out while on the honeymoon trip. But the food options in Paris are so exponentially greater than in the countryside that – statistically at least – you’re more likely to find what you want in Paris than elsewhere in France. Screen Shot 2018-11-20 at 11.53.39 AMWhat about culture? Paris is chock-full of cultural sites and activities. Would culture-loving travellers find enough to satisfy them outside Paris?

There’s all kinds of cultural things to do around France that are very unique, and that you won’t find in the capital. We found old caves in Burgundy, very well-preserved Roman arenas in Provence, and unique museums like the tapestry from the 11th century in Bayeux, or the D-Day beach museums. Paris, of course, has a way bigger and better collection of monuments and museums – but there’s plenty for a traveller outside of the capital. 

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We were in awe of how lightly they packed, but you can understand why they had to.

What are some things that travelers should consider doing on a trip beyond Paris? I think for a lot of people, France consists of Paris and Provence, and in Provence they go to the markets, see the lavender and visit cute villages, all of which are undeniably satisfying. But how about some other reasons to venture out? Maybe historical sites? Or jaw-dropping scenery? 

France is extremely diverse. Once you’ve got Paris and Provence out of your system, explore the other sides of France that are very different from what you typically imagine when you picture France. The Alps, the vineyards, the Mediterranean coastline, Carcassonne, the picturesque island Ile de Ré, the dense forests of the national parks… The big thing I learned from this trip was just how wildly diverse France can be.

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Annency.

What is one famous and one obscure thing in Paris and in France profonde that travelers shouldn’t miss? Some things get derided as being touristy, but they draw tourists because they are truly amazing, so I’m thinking of the things that are worth braving the crowds. And then the hidden treasures that don’t have crowds until we ruin them by telling everybody.

In Paris, go and walk along the remnants of the Philippe Auguste wall, it’s a fascinating insight into France from 800 years ago and most people don’t know anything about it. For the more famous side of the city, you’d be mad not to take a stroll through the Marais district, down onto the islands on the Seine River, then along the river sides.

As for France, I found the tiny village of Vezelay to be really interesting, though I don’t think it’s a huge tourist destination unless you’re doing a pilgrimage. They’ve got a bone on display in the crypt of the cathedral that legend says was Mary Magdalene’s. As for a more-known option, check out Annecy in the Alps. Absolutely the most beautiful town in France, end of story.

Screen Shot 2018-11-20 at 11.53.17 AMDid you have any movie moments during your trip, where you saw or experienced France as it’s portrayed in films? I sometimes see little old men wearing berets and riding bikes, with a baguette strapped to the back—absolutely like the iconic photo, though I think several times it has been the same guy. 

When I was struck down by Lyme disease and had to visit two separate doctors in two separate villages, I felt like it could have been a movie scene. They were so friendly, and just as keen to talk about our trip as to cure me. Otherwise, we met so many colourful characters that it felt like it could have been a movie in itself. Small-town mayors, dairy farmers, talkative bartenders, and scores of friendly villagers… I’d love to see the movie version of our own trip!

So, francophiles, do yourself a favor and head on over to the Earful Tower! An interview with the lovely Lina, who is a shoe designer, coming soon!

25 thoughts on “France’s Cutest Couple?

  1. SO the PODCAST is in FRENCH?!!!!!
    I have NEVER LISTENED TO A PODCAST!!!!!!!!!
    WHEN DO YOU HAVE TIME FOR THAT?
    I am SO BEHIND WITH THIS WORLD WE LIVE IN!!!!!
    LOVE THE HONEYMOON IS ON A SCOOTER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!WAY TO GO!
    WHAT MEMORIES!XX

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The Earful Tower podcast is in English. I usually listen in the car or while running. Or while doing something odious (besides driving and running) like cleaning or, the worst, ironing. I have a huge roster that I listen to. Check out the latest season of Serial–so interesting. Or Here’s the Thing.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. This was interesting. It always bothers me when people talk about France, and have always just visited Paris. It so much more than Paris. If they just visit any area, talk to locals, at least try, I think they will retun home with a richer experience. Also your French improves…even just by a few words…
    One week to go – sigh –

    Ali

    .

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I love the Earful Tower! You recommended them to me a while back in a comment that you left on the blog and I have been enjoying them ever since. They are definitely a cute couple!

    Liked by 1 person

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